Plymouth County Commissioners Building - Art

The last week of February 2015 saw the beginning of the demolition of the Plymouth County Commissioners Building on 11 South Russell Street in Plymouth, Massachusetts. . By March 3, it was nothing but rubble. History: From the Plymouth Redevelopment website: "The County Commissioners' building at the south-westerly end of the property was built as a House of Correction in 1853 by architect Jonathan Preston of Boston. It superseded a granite jail built in 1820 (and demolished in 1884), a part of which had been used for long-term incarceration before 1853. As befitting an important civic building, the handsome brick structure was originally fifty feet by thirty-eight, with a stone foundation and rusticated corners of granite. After the new County Prison opened on Obery Street in 1911, the building was renovated to serve as county offices, with a portion leased to the town as a police station." In 1968, Plymouth Police moved into a newer building at the top of the street. The County renovated the offices. Later on, the Law Library occupied half of the top third floor. Below the library was the Second Session Courtroom. Both moved to the new Courthouse on Obery Street in 2007. In 2010, the County sold the 1820 Courthouse and Commissioners Building to the Town of Plymouth. County Offices moved to Obery Street in August 2014. NOTE: The 'FineArt America' watermark does NOT appear on sold images.

1 - 14 of 14 (0.001 s)

1 - 14 of 14 (0.001 s)

Cache: mysql | 1 | 1 | | 1